Enter password to unlock your keyring

This messagebox has just started. How to get rid of each time I boot?

Did you recently change your password? I have found that once your login password and keyring password do not match - it prompts you. Or do you have autologin enabled? Then it will also prompt you.

The only other thing I can think of is that for LightDM, the keyring must be named login. :thinking:

Keep an eye on this one; I had settings as user/autologin but system changed it; not me hence I didnt check. (surely nothing to do with grub-install?)
No, its happened again, autologin is no longer sticky - it checks, but next boot unchecked.

Beware many places might be used to set session autologin :


At left is « settings / details / users » at right is « lightdm login screen » ( or whatever its localized name, look for lightdm in your app menu it should pop up ).

Modifications made on one side may override the other.

When I started using Chrome on other distros, this bug occurred. However it’s never happened on UB so I don’t know why you are seeing it.

Two things; the user panel doesnt show user as standard or admin which it should?
I tried to set autologin via bash:
sudo nano /etc/gdm3/custom.conf

There is no custom.conf

There is no gui lightdm but perhaps that you installed it at another time.

UB uses lightdm - not gdm3 - so this doesnt work

Its in the menu - “Login Window”

You set the user to autologin via that (Users tab)

OK so LightDM appears correct too.
Can I try Dconf? if yes, whats the variable?

Lightdm doesnt use dconf. It’s in /etc/lightdm somewhere but cant remember the exact file off the top of my head.

Well this is config without changing anything:

Im just wondering; are you sure the messagebox is a login box?

I am not sure what you are referring to. The user field on the login window is the correct way to set autologin.

If it isnt working for you then I would suggest you should reinstall to clear any odd configuration tries you have done.

Note. The keyring issue is expected … autologin bypasses the normal authentication and the keyring has to be manually unlocked.

You can set a valid keyring password via seahorse.

That did it thanks I had to install seahorse and enter a blank password.
Sorry, but the old reinstall windows thing does not work for this user.
Kazam_screenshot_00029

I did say - and will continue to say - this is development.

However if you aren’t willing to occasionally reinstall from both ISO and the series upgrade process then you are not really helping us test.

As I said earlier; keep an eye on this one the login prompt has started again.

Please report a bug against gnome-keyring since that is the package that has been updated in the last few days

ubuntu-bug gnome-keyring

:+1: …Tis done

This Enter password to unlock your keyring reminds me that [Request] A default way for changing wallpaper every few minutes. Lightdm does not use dconf but Login Window does, sort of. Isn’t there any avoidable mismatch ?

Regarding autologin and unlocking keyring, its indeed not a Budgie specific issue, I have it on all 18.04 installations ( Gnomish’buntu, Xubuntu, Budgie at least ). Once you set autologin, even if you set same password in seahorse, some programs will still trigger the unlocking request ( chrom[e|ium], Nautilus… )

Only workaround known is to set no password in seahorse which is less safe as the passwords are stored unencrypted in this case.
https://wiki.gnome.org/Projects/GnomeKeyring/Pam
https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/GNOME/Keyring

@AlistairG may you post the link to the bug ?

Given that you have set autologin, then password strength and access is neither here nor there. Anyone who has access to your computer has access to everything.

Remember the reason why the login window is there is that is sends the authentication to the session, hence the sessions secure. That’s why you dont see this unlock request.

Autologin means that the session is running unsecured so the password keyring is in a bit of a bind … it wants to be secure but it hasnt received a secure session request … hence it is asking you.